This blog and site is your window into what we are out to achieve, and how
we can make a difference in the world through our commitment to be the most
productive, efficient and profitable bio-dynamic farmers in the country,
supplying the highest quality produce to our community.

This will be achieved by; 1) working in tandem with our environment, enhancing
and repairing the surrounding area, being leaders in this field within the
community; 2) having our enterprises be models on which others can learn from and
replicate, and be a lasting contribution to society by demonstrating what is
possible; and 3) having the food we grow and produce be the most nutritious,
mouth-watering, gorgeous and delicious food ever tasted!

All of this will be achieved by using sustainable practices, minimising our
impact on the planet and all of its inhabitants.

Chuck_duck1_crop

The content of the posts will primarily be about what we are doing on the
farm and matters that relate to that, like organic food, bio-dynamics and
community supported agriculture. We may wander slightly off topic to include
material on sustainability, the environment, climate change and the like, but
generally we’ll remain in the green arena.

 

 

And what is this term ‘tree-changers’? Wikipedia describe it by including it
in their description of the related Australian term, ‘sea-change’.

"A sea-change (or sea change)
is an abandonment of city living in favour of a perceived ‘easier life’ in rural
coastal communities. The term derives from the popular ABC TV television
series SeaChange,
which triggered the phenomenon of many city-dwellers mimicking the drama’s
protagonist’s escape from urban life. The result of this phenomenon
(known as the ‘sea change effect’) is a rapid boom in tourism and real estate
development in coastal Australia, particularly in New
South Wales
. A similar term, tree-change,
describes the movement of urbanites to the countryside."
Click here
for the Wikipedia page.

In other parts of the world, what we are doing is probably called
‘homesteading’ or ‘small plot farming’ or ‘alternative life styling’.

So let us know what you think about what we are doing, and what
you’d like
to see here on the site. Is there any topic you like to see discussed
or researched? Head down to the comments link below, and thanks for
reading.

4
Comments
  1. Hi Bill, Thanks for your comments and praise as you never can be too sure if what you are writing is hitting the spot and making a difference. Whilst I know each of us have differing circumstances and reasons for being where we are, to borrowing a phrase from a too well known broadcaster, ‘Live the Dream’. I’ll drop in to your blog shortly. All the best.

    • That’s a very complicated quoiestn because it depends on how many pigs you’re raising and how you do it.There is infra-structure such as fencing. If you just raise one pig then all that gets costed to the single pig. If you raise four pigs then divide it by four to get the per pig cost. Even there it will vary greatly depending on your management style pasture, pens, etc. Figure on $100 to $500 depending on how fancy you get.There is the cost of the piglet. See our for current pricing. Currently boar piglets are $150 as of the winter of 2011. This varies greatly with location and with the time of year that you buy as well as the sex of the pig. You also get what you pay for. Don’t buy culls. Some people bring in truck loads of cull pigs from the confinement farms. These pigs aren’t growing well enough for the big operators to keep them so they dispose of them. Instead, put your money into better quality pigs that were born locally. They’ll have a leg up on thriving in your climate. Also look to get pigs from someone who is doing it the way you want to raise your pigs. I’ve heard of many a disaster where people took factory farm pigs and tried to put them on pasture or even simply not feeding the commercial hog feed. Those pigs have been bred for one diet and climate control. Without it they don’t thrive.Then there is feed. A pig eats about 700 to 1,000 lbs of feed depending on the pig (some are more efficient), the time of year (colder means energy goes to body heating), how big you got the pigs at, how big you’re raising them to and what is in the feed. Note that after about 250 lbs the gain to feed ratio declines. If you’re buying grain then price it locally for 800 lbs and that will give you a guestimate as to the cost of the feed. Figure on about $200 as a rough guess. This will vary with what you choose (organic, GMO, Chinese Melamine, etc) and how large a quantity you buy at a time.Alternatively you can raise them on pasture and augment with dairy like we do, grain or other good foods. This dramatically cuts the cost of the feed and it increases the quality of the pork. The flavor of the pork is set in the fat during the last two weeks to a month of the pig’s life. Apples, nuts and other good foods are great choices.There may be some other incidental costs but that is most of it. Figure on spending about $450 to $850.Then once you have the pig raised up you need to turn it into pork, sausage, hams and bacon. If you hire this done then figure on $150 to $200. This varies greatly with the region.Grand total of about $600 to $1050 plus your time depending on how you do it. See the article on which will give you some weights to work with. Note that this is a real rough write up of the costs and they’ll vary greatly depending on a lot of factors.

  2. It was great to discover your blog, I have read most of your posts and find them very well put together with lots of information and links. My wife and I left Sydney for the country in the 90’s however for various reasons we had to come back. We’ve now been back 7 years, longer than we were on the North Coast for. However the dream lives on :). In the search for coping mechanisms I have decided to start my own blog and write about stuff I find interesting. Its early days, so far its been interesting. Keep up the good work and the writing.

    • That’s a very complicated quiosetn because it depends on how many pigs you’re raising and how you do it.There is infra-structure such as fencing. If you just raise one pig then all that gets costed to the single pig. If you raise four pigs then divide it by four to get the per pig cost. Even there it will vary greatly depending on your management style pasture, pens, etc. Figure on $100 to $500 depending on how fancy you get.There is the cost of the piglet. See our for current pricing. Currently boar piglets are $150 as of the winter of 2011. This varies greatly with location and with the time of year that you buy as well as the sex of the pig. You also get what you pay for. Don’t buy culls. Some people bring in truck loads of cull pigs from the confinement farms. These pigs aren’t growing well enough for the big operators to keep them so they dispose of them. Instead, put your money into better quality pigs that were born locally. They’ll have a leg up on thriving in your climate. Also look to get pigs from someone who is doing it the way you want to raise your pigs. I’ve heard of many a disaster where people took factory farm pigs and tried to put them on pasture or even simply not feeding the commercial hog feed. Those pigs have been bred for one diet and climate control. Without it they don’t thrive.Then there is feed. A pig eats about 700 to 1,000 lbs of feed depending on the pig (some are more efficient), the time of year (colder means energy goes to body heating), how big you got the pigs at, how big you’re raising them to and what is in the feed. Note that after about 250 lbs the gain to feed ratio declines. If you’re buying grain then price it locally for 800 lbs and that will give you a guestimate as to the cost of the feed. Figure on about $200 as a rough guess. This will vary with what you choose (organic, GMO, Chinese Melamine, etc) and how large a quantity you buy at a time.Alternatively you can raise them on pasture and augment with dairy like we do, grain or other good foods. This dramatically cuts the cost of the feed and it increases the quality of the pork. The flavor of the pork is set in the fat during the last two weeks to a month of the pig’s life. Apples, nuts and other good foods are great choices.There may be some other incidental costs but that is most of it. Figure on spending about $450 to $850.Then once you have the pig raised up you need to turn it into pork, sausage, hams and bacon. If you hire this done then figure on $150 to $200. This varies greatly with the region.Grand total of about $600 to $1050 plus your time depending on how you do it. See the article on which will give you some weights to work with. Note that this is a real rough write up of the costs and they’ll vary greatly depending on a lot of factors.

Near River Produce - Real food direct from our farm located on the NSW Mid North Coast